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February 8, 2011

Seven Dollars = The Best Christmas EVER


"I jammed the roscoe in his button and said, 'Close your yap, bo, or I squirt metal.'" The flim-flammer jumped in the flivver and faded.

I yelled, "You dumb mug, get your mitts off the marbles before I stuff that mud-pipe down your mush--and tell your moll to hand over the mazuma." Then the sucker with the schnozzle poured a slug but before he could scram out two shamuses showed him the shiv.





9 comments:

Wetzy said...

What! No Spud Gun?

Quite Rightly said...

Why 10 shots? In a civil society, who needs more than 5?

Zio Rico said...

Hasbro, as I recall, made a 30-cap clip.

sig94 said...

In the 20's and early 30's you could buy the real thing, a full automatic Thompson .45 submachine for $175-200. They didn't sell as well as hoped (the Army didn't buy many until WWII) so Auto Ordnance even had them for sale in drug stores.

Now only available in single action, Thompson prices begin at $1,200. The 100 round drum magazine costs almost $600 all by itself and is prohibited in states that hate fun - of course those states are CA, HI, MA, MD, NJ and NY.

http://www.auto-ordnance.com/PA-1TH_t.html

The_Kid said...

That's me in the pic and the video btw.

My Dad could have carried a Thompson or an M1 in WWII. He carried the M1 because he said you could barely hit the side of a barn with the Thompson.

Nickie Goomba said...

That detective set drove me down the wrong road, my friends. By the age of 9, I was a two pack a day man... Camels. I didn't start swilling bourbon 'til I was in puberty.

Nickie Goomba said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

I can't even think what the nannys would do if this was advertised on tv now

Rhod said...

In the 1950's, the toy section in Hartford's G. Fox department store looked like an arsenal. I think they even had a flame thrower. The only thing they never carried was a toy land mine. We had to make our own (sigh).